Artists with events

Apashe

The Legend... Soon after contamination, signs of the virus spread quickly through the village of Androphage. Fear and anxiety intensified as villagers, one-by-one, began to exhibit shocking symptoms; turning against each other in a gruesome hunt for flesh and blood. In no time the village was completely infected. The source of the deadly disease was a mystery, but fingers pointed at the primary victims of infection: the Apacheans, a family whose ancestors ironically founded the village itself. As the disease ravaged the ancestral family, turning them into voracious beasts hungry for nothing but the raw and bloody flesh of their fellow villagers, Apashe, the eldest son, was miraculously spared. Born on the reserve and trained in arts of survival, Apashe was taught to be a warrior; a defender of everything his ancestors believed in. His presence was unassuming, but the native blood that surged through his veins made him a powerful fighter. Witnessing the destruction his family had caused as the first to be infected, Apashe confronted them. There was no escaping their wrath, and so, amidst the madness in the household, Apashe reached for his grandfather’s tomahawk. As he ferociously swung the ancient weapon at the savages, Apashe knew the flesh he cut into repeatedly was that of his own blood; his own family. Fighting for his life, Apashe’s mind spun and anger rushed through his shaking body. In a final spit of rage and lunacy Apashe managed to behead the last attacker; his father. Horrified and drenched in sinew he stood among the mangled remains, blood flooding at his feet. He had managed to escape their blood-thirsty urges. As he reached for the front door, he glanced back one last time at his dismembered family. His father lay closest, and reaching down and taking a two-feather necklace from his father’s headless body, he made a promise to avenge whoever was responsible. Outside, the village was in shreds and crazed inhabitants dominated. Terror shook the land. There was only one thing left to do; burn them all. The smoke stung his eyes as he stood atop a ridge overlooking the smouldering village. Shrieks could be heard echoing through the impending night as the blood continued to drip from his grandfather’s tomahawk that hung from his hand. With the village ablaze and the only memento now tucked into his hair, Apashe watched as his homeland turned to ash. Suddenly, through tear-filled eyes he noticed a shadow lurking near the edge of the forest; a shadow he hadn’t seen since that fateful day the village revolted against one of its own. Shocked and appalled he quickly wiped the tears away; his blood bubbling as suspicion turned to disbelief. It couldn’t be; but it was. Dr. Kannibal had risen from the dead. Apashe will have his vengeance.

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J.Cole

And they say you can’t go home again. Following 2011’s Cole World: The Sideline Story and 2013’s Born Sinner, Jermaine Lamarr Cole, aka Roc Nation rapper J. Cole, has returned to his childhood home in Fayetteville, North Carolina on his new, third album: 2014 Forest Hills Drive. Released December 9, 2014 Forest Hills Drive is a concept record about how a boy discovered his purpose, written from the perspective of a superstar rapper questioning the facets of fame. It is a meditation on the value of love relative to worldly success. And it is an extraordinary work from an artist who continues to grow and create. The narrative is a tale of Cole’s and also serves as a series of metaphors that complete a story of passion, growth and ultimately reflection. It’s an album to ingest as a whole with the sum of its parts creating the full tale. Known for his reflective lyricism, J. Cole attributes his musical identity to the house where, crucially, he had his first ‘own bedroom’. “Having my own room allowed me turn into who I am. I enjoy privacy, I enjoy being by myself. That came from having my own room. Having my own room allowed me to shape myself.” For J. Cole the young teenager, having his own bedroom was a sign of progress. When it comes to signifiers of success as an adult, Cole’s are impressive. He signed to Roc Nation before turning 25. His sophomore album Born Sinner outsold Kanye West’s Yeezus. This year his acclaimed peer Kendrick Lamar professed deep admiration for J. Cole’s lyricism. Then Jay-Z draped Cole with his chain in during a Master Square Garden concert on Cole’s 29th birthday. J. Cole debuted in 2007 with his mixtape The Come Up. He followed this with a second mixtape The Warm Up (2009), and shined on “A Star Is Born” from Jay-Z’s album The Blueprint 3. A fervent fan base – of boys and girls, men and women – were with him. It’s for them that Cole has since 2013 conducted an annual tour called “Dollar And A Dream” where fans willing paying one buck are treated to tracks from his early work. That’s payback. Born to an African-American father in the military and a white mother, Cole’s nuanced notions of race – and his fearlessness when speaking out on the topic – imbue 2014 Forest Hills Drive. It was while finishing the album that the situation in Ferguson reached a boiling point. J. Cole wrote and recorded and released the “Be Free”, a soul cry wherein the rapper sang his heart out: “Ain’t no gun they make that can kill my soul.” "Be Free" is a powerful reaction to a fucked-up situation. The song is not on Cole’s new album. The album has no built-up single, no pre-release teaser. 2014 Forest Hills Drive will, inevitably, be analyzed to every last verb and snare. But the music speaks for itself. 2014 Forest Hills Drive does more than immortalizes an address in Fayetteville, North Carolina. It speaks to a progression in a young life emotionally and also from a socio-economic vantage point. From an all black trailer park in cramped quarters to a two-story house on a tree lined street with a carport and bedrooms for each family member. As the years and jobs of his mother improved so did the living situations and therefore the openness to get creative. With the new private bedroom coupled with a growing interest in rap music fueled by one summer-long visit by a cousin from down south who ushered in No Limit style hip hop the seeds of the future rapper were there. The songs create a narrative and the mood varies from song to song. He wants success (“Fire Squad”), he sees growth (“A Tale Of 2 Citiez”), gets deep on storytelling (“‘03 Adolescence”, “Wet Dreamz”), hits bumps (““G.O.M.D.,” “No Role Modelz”) and comes full circle to what it all means to him and the notion of love (“Apparently,” “Love Yourz”). The act of writing rhymes transformed Cole’s perceptions of the potential of words. By 1998 he heard Canibus and Eminem, and fell in thrall to the MCs slant-rhymes, enjambment, and multi-layered metaphors. “It was interesting to me because I knew you had to be smart to rap like that, to put together words like that. Then I got into Pun and Big L, lyricists, these guys with punch lines and flows. Then I’d hear Nas differently, like oh this is why this is amazing! It opened my whole world. I was never the same.” A subsequent article in the school newspaper about a local hip-hop group called Bomb Shelter inspired Cole to go check them out at a skating rink. That night, when the invitation to come on stage was extended to anyone in the crowd who wanted to rhyme, Cole got in line. “I was so nervous, had to face my fear. All these other dudes 20-plus years old were up there rapping. When it came my turn I spit one of the best verses I had. I could see the expression in everyone’s face like, damn this kid is crazy!" After invitation to visit Bomb Shelter in their studio, Cole peeped producer Nervous Wreck’s set-up – and realized it was possible to make his own beats himself. "I used to ask my mom every day to take me by McFadden Music," says Cole, grinning like a kid in a candy store. "She’d let me be in there for 20 or 30 minutes. They had drum machines. There was one red machine, the Roland ASR X-Pro. It was mad expensive, like $1600, $1700, so she put it on a layaway plan. After that everything changed. Everyday I spent on that beat machine. I became immersed. Made my first song with that beat machine when I was 15. All this stuff took place in the house at 2014 Forest Hills Drive." For J. Cole, success has brought the chance to address and redress the past. This year, he bought his childhood home at 2014 Forest Hills Drive in Fayetteville. He invited fans to the crib to debut the album of the same name. But the experience of “going home” went deeper than he was prepared for. “My mom doesn’t want or need the house now,” explains Cole, adding that when they returned to the house together, “she was crying. There were tough memories for her there. Here’s a house that represents a dream that she tried to make work, having a husband and a family and a house to grow old together in. I had to sit back and think about the way she must have been feeling.” Empathetic lyricism and true soul music remains the molten core of Cole’s work. (His new label Dreamville – its first two artists are Bas and Cozz – exemplifies that aesthetic. Get ready, 2015!) In the moment though, it’s Cole’s ability to reflect upon a situation, to not be afraid to look back in order to progress, that takes the form of one striking couplet on the new album: “The good news is, nigga, you came a long way / The bad news is, nigga, you went the wrong way.” Yet for J. Cole and his fans, resolution lies just around the corner. Welcome to 2014 Forest Hills Drive.

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Julia Jacklin

BBC Radio 6 Album of the Day Fbi Album of the Week Vinyl Me Please Album of the Week Loud & Quiet Magazine Album of the Week Resident Music Album of the Week ✭✭✭✭ Q Magazine "Don't Let The Kids Win reverberates with a sense of truth that only the truly exceptional can convey" ✭✭✭✭ Mojo "Her voice cool as winter and sultry as summer, as intrinsically sad as her songs' distressing emotional punch…a worthy addition to the genre" ✭✭✭✭ The Guardian "Don't Let The Kids Win feels very much like one of those albums that will slowly creep into the affections of a large number of people; it's that lovely" ✭✭✭✭ All Music "Jacklin's cracking, pensive delivery land her in the sphere with heavy-hitters such as Sharon Van Etten and Angle Olsen, with a touch of Lucinda Williams, making it a must for fans of thoughtful indie folk" 8/10 Uncut "A sturdy, touching arrival" ✭✭✭✭ Rolling Stone Australia "You can just imagine yourself drunk, swaying along with her band and someone you love in a dimly lit bar" ✭✭✭✭✩ Beat Magazine "a stunning debut, cohesively putting forward well-crafted and emotive beauties that shine with quiet confidence" ✭✭✭✭✩ The Brag "the most striking element of Don't Let The Kids Win is how much she sounds like herself" "Don't Let The Kids Win is an album that works on levels that words don't reach. More than anything else, it is the sound of a singer at full control of their talents; the sound of a generous voice that asks nothing of you but that you listen" ✭✭✭✭ Herald Sun "Pool Party and Leadlight lead the record in an unfairly good one-two punch. Both are note perfect" ✭✭✭✭ DIY Mag "Don't Let The Kids Win shines brightest for its clear, and charismatic narrative voice" ✭✭✭✭ The Music "Equal parts lovely and disquieting" ✭✭✭✭ New Noise "Don’t Let The Kids Win is a record full of slow burners, that dwindling flame that you hope never goes out because it’s the final embrace of warmth left. 8/10 Loud & Quiet "Underpinning it all is her achingly sad vocal delivery, which oozes conviction throughout" 7.5/10 Consequence of Sound "…the ability to craft songs infused with wisdom and wonder in equal measure, Jacklin's staying power is strong" 7.5/10 The Line Of Best Fit "a genuine instinct for musical direction, which shines through in her undeniable knack for delivering sardonic one-liners enveloped in soft, touching pastoral melodies. It's that good ol' ozzy wit busting through that classic American sentimentality. And it's an intoxicating mix" "On Don't Let The Kids Win, Jacklin proves herself to be an unlikely alt-country heroine, delivering an impressive album that shows she has enough wit and wisdom to fill up a canyon or two" 7.5/10 Tonedeaf "the opening three tracks - one of the more impressive openings to a record you'll hear this year" 7/10 Exclaim! "The various ways that Jacklin puts these feelings into motion through song proves how far-reaching her abilities are…this is an album of life lessons learned" Washington Post "Julia Jacklin's captivating debut, is a folk-rock album elevated by her empathetic lyrics and delicate but expressive voice" Paste Magazine "Jacklin's vocals are gentle one moment and forceful the next, with the unexpected shifts adding urgency to her words" NPR ""Julia Jacklin hits right in the heart" LA Times "Jacklin approaches the art of song with a few essential tools: a subtly played electric guitar, a breathtaking precise voice that can move through octaves with the glee of a gymnast and an innate skill at channeling emotion through sparse, loaded lyrics" Rolling Stone Country "…somewhere between stark Americana and jagged alt-country - imagine Cat Power at last call in a honky tonk" Chicago Reader "…it's definitely put its hooks in me" Brooklyn Vegan “L.A. Dream” is just Julia and her guitar, and it’s the kind of song you just know can silence a room. Most of the song is very quiet, but Julia gets just a little louder before dropping the song’s title — “loving you ain’t easy, babe, it’s just an L.A. Dreeeeaaaaaaam — and then quiets right back down again. it’s such a simple thing, but it can really knock you out" Music Feeds "Jacklin's slow, swung alt-country folk music is fast approaching the bright lights of international stardom" Sunday Times UK "…her brilliant debut album captures a talent in its first, thrilling bloom" The Revue "…one of music's fastest-rising stars with one of the year's most inspiring and remarkable achievements" Irish Times "...this is music to warm the soul and set hearts ablaze" Hot Press "2016 could go down as the year of the sultry country chanteuse, from Lera Lynn to Michele Stodart, but it might use be an Aussie (Jacklin) who trumps them all" Vogue "a bonafide star in the making" Noisey ""Julia Jacklin examines themes of love and loss and youthfulness with a prickling sense of self-awareness" Vinyl Me Please "…it has an unwound uniqueness that proves her first album can stand alone among similar music—it’s got it’s own brand of youth, quirks, honesty" NME "Makes me think of Angel Olsen meeting Fleetwood Mac on a dusty highway somewhere serene, and is really rather lovely" Radio New Zealand "Jacklin is a supple singer with good, lyrically inventive songs, and she’s made an album that has allowed those songs to actually travel somewhere" Drift Records "Her vocal is AMAZING... if you think you like Lana Del Ray cause she sounds like she's on tranquilizers, wise up... this is how you sing with swagger... utterly brilliant. Country jams, but with indie hooks and again, she sounds like a million dollars. Get into this early, she's going to get talked about a lot"

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